The Paper is regarding nursing theory application regarding a nursing situation

The Paper is regarding nursing theory application regarding a nursing situation

The Paper is regarding nursing theory application regarding a nursing situation. A nursing theory is applied to a nursing situation and 3 literature review articles are applied to support the topic. I have started with the rough draft and bones of the paper as well as the nursing situation. I have also already added several articles that can be applied to the lit review.
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Application of Smith’s Theory of Unitary Caring in Nursing Care of Patients with Long-Term
Inpatient Care and Disturbed Thought Process Related to Depression Caused by Sense of Abandonment
Idotenyin Anosike, BSN, RN, CCRN
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University
NGR 6811-002: Philosophical and Theoretical Foundation of Advanced Practice Roles
Dr. Howard Butcher
April 19, 2021
Introduction
Nursing Situation
Janet King was a patient in the transplant intensive care unit. Her liver was failing her and she was in bad shape. Fortunately, there was bitter-sweet news on the horizon. There had been a recent casualty and a donor had been matched to Janet to allow her to receive a new liver. Mrs. King was no stranger to the transplant intensive care unit. She had been struggling for several years with her failing liver. Her first admission was a result of nausea and vomiting with a blood alcohol level. She was struggling with alcohol abuse and also had a form of hepatitis. She almost lost her life but with time she became well enough to discharge home. She was admitted into the hospital’s sobriety program and made complete progress and successfully gave up on alcohol. Unfortunately due to her already damaged liver, she had to make many more visits into the hospital to treat one condition or the other. Because of her long- standing history with all of the staff on the floor, it was a celebration to see her liver finally arrive. Everyone rejoiced and was genuiniely happy for her.
The recover post- transplant was very rough. Mrs. King ran several days with reoccurring fevers. She had a history of diabetes and her blood sugars were either dangerously elevated or life-threatening low. This was not the ideal environment for the new liver. Eventually, Mrs. King was starting to recover physically. Mentally, however ,Mrs. King was broken down. She did not have the will power to eat. She did not have the will power to feed herself. She rejected physical therapy right and left. She complained when encouraged to get out of bed into the chair, and soon after being in the chair she asked to be placed back in bed. She didn’t make any attempt to avoid voiding on herself in bed. The physicians were confused and annoyed- “ She should be happy, she just got a brand new liver for Pete’s sake” they would say amongst the staff and themselves. I tried to encourage the patient and offer kind words and caring measures. Some days Mrs. King would try and other days she just did not want to participate. Time eventually passed and the patient was downgraded to floor that provided for patient with lower acuity levels.
Many weeks later, my charge nurse informed me that I would be receiving an admission. This was one of our previous patients that was being admitted for fever post recent liver transplant. To my surprise, the patient was Mrs. King. To me even more surprise, Mrs. King was being admitted from a rehab floor. She was never fully discharged home. On the first day of admission, she was very labile and her temperature remained in the high 101 to 102.4 F . She was tachycardic, cold, and had a headache. She only wanted her medication and to be in the quiet room with all of the lights off and windows closed. She stated that she felt very sick and tired.The only thing that was keeping her together was that she was looking forward to her husband’s visit the following day. As a nurse, I understood that peace and relaxation was necessary for her body to rocoup and recover. I provided her with plenty of fluids and grouped her care so that I did not have to enter her room every five minutes to disturb the resting/recovery process.
The following day, Mrs. King seemed a little more active. She remained quiet however she had the television on, which was a positive step. I walked in the room to give her some medicine, and I noticed that she was crying on the phone. Her husband let her know that he would not be coming. Mrs. King was devastated. She was very upset. Unfortunately, her husband had a record of telling her that he would be there the next day, but then he would call the nurses and explain that he wouldn’t be making it because of one excuse or another. I was very upset for my patient. I told her that I was very upset with her husband and stated that we are going to work together to get better and have the energy to go home and turn things right side up. A little while later, her husband called to speak to me to get an update. I informed him of her condition but also stated that a large part of her recovery is to be around loved ones. I reminded him that even though she has been with us for a long time, she really truly doesn’t know us like she knows her family. I also confronted him regarding him telling her that he he is coming and then telling us that he wouldn’t be able to make it. He told me that his wife was very confused. I informed him that his wife was in fact very coherent and named a few things that she did and recalled that supported what I was saying. He did not have much to say after that. I informed the patient that I was able to give her husband some updates and also encouraged her that she is getting better and that she is not confused at all. She started to feel more comfortable with me and started to talk about how she was feeling. She felt abandoned by her body because she felt that her body betrayed her by not giving her enough chances to sober up. She felt abandoned by her new liver because the recovery was taking weeks and it didn’t seem like she was getting any better. She also felt abandoned by her husband and daughters because weeks had passed and she hadn’t seen any of them , despite the fact that they don’t live very far away. She had thoughts of giving up and just letting herself go. She knew when she needed to use the toilet, however chose to soil herself. Often times, she did not want to be changed even when soaked in urine. This was very much unlike the woman who we initially met. She was very down and depressed by everything that was going on around her.
Concepts
The concept of self and family abandonment and
The concept of nursing compassion and patient self confidence
Theoretical Principles
Marlaine Smiths Unitary Caring Theory
Literature Review
Theoretical Application
Summary
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Theory Application Paper Grading Criteria
ATTACH THIS SCORE TABLE TO THE END OF YOUR PAPER IN WORD FORMAT
8
Criteria
Points
INTRODUCTION (first paragraph of the paper, per APA, do not put this heading in the paper) Short paragraph to introduce the topic with demographic characteristics, prevalence and/or incidence of the patient-centered phenomenon. End this paragraph with an aim/purpose statement.
10
BODY (You MUST use the following outline as section headers)
Nursing Situation: Clinical practice phenomenon /nursing situation is clearly described (no more than 1 page) 10
Concepts: Two concepts of the phenomena from your nursing situation described above are identified and
rationale provided. These concepts must derive from the nursing situation, not from a theory. 10
nursing situation
Grand Nursing Theory or Middle Range Nursing Theory: One grand theory (from Smith (2020) or middle range theory (from Smith) is identified with rationale as to why this theory pertains to the phenomena described above. Concepts of the theory that apply to the phenomenon are explained as well as how they relate to your
20
Theory Application and Literature Review: The concepts from the theory and the phenomena are used to retrieve relevant research articles (published within the last 5 years, except for seminal articles) and content from those articles are described. Minimum of 3 research articles from peer-reviewed scholarly journals are required. Content from the retrieved article(s) are applied to the practice nursing situation within the theoretical framework described above. If you quote the article, quotations need to be thoroughly introduced, explained, analyzed, and connected to the content. The theory application needs to be directly linked to your nursing situation, concepts and literature. To receive full points, you MUST synthesize what you learned from the literature and how this knowledge can be applied. Repeating and regurgitating what is already stated in the literature will not meet the requirement.
.
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Nursing Interventions: Nursing interventions and/or actions are identified and discussed based upon knowledge gained from the findings of the literature search above. Once this is completed, the interventions and/or actions can be further discussed based upon your own knowledge and experience. Nursing interventions need to be creative and innovative – you must go beyond educating the patient.
10
CONCLUSION
Summary: Summarizes purpose of the paper, and specific lessons learned, recommendations for research, and 5
health policy as appropriate.
SCHOLARLY WRITING
APA format 7th Edition is used for title page, levels of heading and referenced citations in text. A reference list is 5
provided using APA. The paper is formatted and organized using APA criteria.
Total 100
Writing Style: There is a strong introduction and conclusion; scholarly writing style is used; correctly uses first person pronouns when applicable; The paper includes appropriate sentence and paragraph length, organization, levels of heading, grammar, logic, and flow. The content is presented with clarity and integrated to meet paper purposes.
5
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Lit Review:
Parker, M. E., & Smith, M. C. (2020). Marlaine smith’s theory of unitary caring. In Nursing theories & nursing practice (pp. 493–502). F.A. Davis.
Haws, J. M. (2015). Anxiety and depression: the hidden cost of long-term conditions. Practice Nurse, 45(4), 41–45.
Watson, J. and Smith, M.C.. (2002), Caring science and the science of unitary human beings: a trans‐theoretical discourse for nursing knowledge development. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 37: 452-461. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02112.x
Martin F. (2006). Post-surgical depression. Recognizing depression after a coronary artery bypass graft. British Journal of Nursing, 15(13), 703–706. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2006.15.13.21480
Smith, M. C. (1999). Caring and the Science of Unitary Human Beings. Advances in Nursing Science, 21(4), 14–28.
Dunn, D. J. (2009). A way of knowing, being, valuing and living with compassion energy: a unitary Science and Nursing as Caring perspective. Visions: The Journal of Rogerian Nursing Science, 40.
Chuang, Y.‐H. and Kuo, L.‐M. (2018), Nurses’ confidence in providing and managing care for older persons with depressive symptoms or depression in long‐term care facilities: A national survey. Int J Mental Health Nurs, 27: 1767-1775. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12483
Heveran, L., & Andrewes, T. (2020). Nursing measures to support the needs of haematological cancer survivors post-treatment: a literature review. British Journal of Nursing, 29(3), S18–S24. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2020.29.3.S18
Gehring, M. B., Lerret, S., Johnson, J., Rieder, J., Nelson, D., Copeland, L., & Titan, A. (2020). Patient expectations for recovery after elective surgery: a common-sense model approach. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 43(2), 185. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-019-00097-2

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